});

Monday, June 27, 2016

How to Make Apple Pie Moonshine

Apple Pie Moonshine

So, you want to know how to make apple pie moonshine, eh? You've come to the right place.
Apple pie shine is probably the most popular and sought after type of bootleg whiskey ever made, and for good reason - it's delicious. We've already posted procedures for making a basic mash and even instructions on making peach moonshine. Here is our favorite (high octane) apple pie moonshine recipe.
apple pie moonshine 2 small

Details:

Prep time: 5 minutes.
Cook time: 30 minutes.
Yield: Just over 2 quarts of 70 proof Apple Pie Moonshine.
Taste: Absolutely yummy, but knock your socks off strong.
 

Ingredients:

1 quart of 150 proof, pure corn whiskey moonshine (everclear could be used as a substitute).
3 cans of frozen apple concentrate.
8 cinnamon sticks.
0-2 cups brown sugar*.
 
*Depending on how sweet you want it to be, you may add up to twice as much of these particular items (in other words, 1 or 2 cups of brown sugar instead of none).
 

Directions:

The "Instant Satisfaction" Method

First, add the apple concentrate, cinnamon sticks and brown sugar to a pot. Bring to a boil and then simmer on very low heat, covered, for 20-30 minutes. Stir a few times as it is heating up to dissolve the sugar. Heating causes the cinnamon sticks to release their flavor very quickly, allowing you to be able to drink it immediately. I like to call this the "instant satisfaction" method.
After simmering, remove the pot from heat and let it cool.  Make sure it is completely cool, and none of the burners on the stove are on before moving on to the next step.
After the mixture has cooled, split it between 4 pint jars (or 2 quart jars). Top the jars off with 150 proof corn whiskey. Remember, 100+ proof moonshine is flammable. You do not want to do this anywhere near a heat source.
If you completed all of the steps, congratulations, you just made your very own apple pie moonshine. You can start enjoying the fruits of your labor immediately.  
The "no-boil" method
They say that good things come to those who wait, and we think that this statement applies to apple pie moonshine as well as it does to anything else. If you want to make a truly supreme batch of apple pie shine, you'll want to use this method. The "instant satisfaction" method listed above causes flavor to be rapidly released from cinnamon sticks, making your batch instantly drinkable. However, "steeping" the ingredients overnight, without boiling, produces a better product. Why? Well, we aren't exactly sure, but we think that boiling the cinnamon sticks cause additional flavors to be released, making the final product ever so slightly bitter. The "no boil" method provides 100% of the flavor with none of the bitterness.
Beware, this recipe is high proof. A lot of recipes call for adding a gallon apple this and a gallon of apple that, but by the time you're done adding all that liquid, you've dropped your proof down into the baby formula range. Apple concentrate provides apple flavor without compromising proof. This stuff sneaks up on you - and then it punches you in the face! But it's oh, so good.

apple pie moonshine spice mix

Gourmet Apple Pie Moonshine

The above mentioned recipe (cinnamon, sugar, and apple juice concentrate only) will make a great batch of apple pie moonshine. However, add spices like ginger, orange peel, cloves, allspice, vanilla bean, peppercorn, etc... and you'll have something that will make your tastebuds do backflips. There are plenty of recipes on the web for more complicated versions of apple pie moonshine. Some of them are great, other are OK, but most are sorely lacking. We know this firsthand here at Clawhammer Supply, because we've tried a lot of them out. We did this because we've been working on a top secret project for a while now - the creation of a perfect blend of apple pie moonshine spices. After making many, many test batches, and drinking a lot, lot, lot of apple pie moonshine, we finally landed on a recipe that we're 100% sure will melt your tastebuds into a puddle of awesomeness. We proudly present to you our very own Apple Pie Moonshine Spice Mix. Check out that link to buy some, or head on over to our sister site, How to Make Apple Pie Moonshine for more info and additional recipes.

Hot Apple Pie Moonshine

If you would like to serve up some hot apple pie moonshine, here's what we would suggest.  Use the recipe above to make standard apple pie moonshine.  Then, buy a couple of gallons of apple cider and spice it to taste using the same ingredients above.  Heat it in a crock pot WITHOUT the apple pie moonshine.  (You don't want to add the moonshine because you'll vaporize all of the alcohol if you heat it over a long period of time.)  Just set the jar of apple pie moonshine next to the crock pot and let your guests add a bit (or a lot) to each cup of cider they pour.

Source:
http://www.clawhammersupply.com/blogs/moonshine-still-blog/6217636-apple-pie-moonshine

 

How to Make Charcoal

Lump charcoal, which is made by burning pieces of wood until all the impurities are gone and only the coal remains, is an excellent choice for outdoor grilling. It's expensive to buy lump charcoal at the store, but making your own is a cheap and simple solution. Read on to learn how to make it using two different methods.

Lighting a Bonfire

  1.  
    Locate an area where you can build an outdoor fire. You may be able to do this in your backyard, or you may need to secure a different site with a permit. Check your city's ordinances on outdoor fires.


  2.  
    Get a metal drum. This is the container into which you'll put the wood. Choose a drum as large or as small as you'd like, depending on how much charcoal you want to make. Make sure it has a flame-proof lid.
  3.  
    Pick out wood to make into charcoal. What type of wood do you want to use for your charcoal? Choose wood that has been cured. Cherry wood, oak wood, or hickory wood all work well.[1] Check around to see if people in your area have wood for sale, or pick up some at a home and garden supply store. You'll need enough to fill up your drum to the top. Chop the wood into 4-inch pieces.[2]
  4.  
    Fill the drum with the cured wood. Pack the drum tightly with wood, and fill it all the way to the top. Put the lid on the drum. It should close well enough to stay in place, but you don't want it to be airtight.
  5.  
    Prepare to light a bonfire. Buy or gather extra wood to make a bonfire that will burn for 3 - 5 hours. Build it up on your chosen site. Leave a hole in the middle for the drum. Put the drum in the hole and cover it with more wood.[3]
  6.  
    Burn the bonfire. Keep it going for at least 3 hours, more if you're using a large drum packed with wood. Let the fire completely burn out and cool down before approaching the drum.
  7.  
    Remove the lump coal. When you open the lid, you'll see a fresh batch of pure lump coal. Use it to grill for the rest of the summer.

    Method 2

Using Two Drums

  1.  
    Buy a small drum and a larger drum. The small drum must fit in the larger one with plenty of room to spare. Using a 30 gallon (113.6 L) drum inside a 55 gallon (208.2 L) drum works well.[4]
  2.  
    Cut a fuel hold in the larger drum. Use a metal jigsaw blade to make a square cut in the base of the larger drum. It should be about 12 inches (30.5 cm) by 20 inches (50.8 cm). You'll need this hole to feed fuel into the drum to keep the contents hot.
  3.  
    Drill holes in the bottom of the smaller drum. This allows the extreme heat to pass into the the smaller drum, cooking the wood inside. Drill 5 or 6 1/2-inch holes in the base of the drum.
  4.  
    Fill the small drum with cured wood. Cherry wood, oak wood, or hickory wood chopped into 4-inch pieces is ideal. Pack the drum tightly, then put the lid on top, cracked so moisture can come out.[5]
  5.  
    Make a stand in the larger drum. Place two bricks flat in the bottom of the big drum, one on each side. Stand two more bricks on their long edges on top of the flat bricks. This stand keeps the smaller drum from touching the bottom of the bigger drum, allowing you to feed fuel underneath.
  6.  
    Place the smaller drum on the stand. Make sure it fits well within the larger drum; if it doesn't, use smaller bricks or stones to make a smaller stand. Put the lid on the larger drum, leaving it cracked open for air flow.
  7.  
    Build a fire inside the big drum and let it burn for 7-8 hours. Use wood and kindling to make a fire, feeding the materials through the feeder hole in the bottom of the drum. As the fire gets going, feed it larger pieces of wood.
    • Keep an eye on the fire; when it gets low, feed it more wood.
    • You want the fire to get as hot as possible, so keep feeding dense wood.
  8.  
    Let the fire burn out. After 7-8 hours, the impurities, moisture, and gasses will have burned out of the wood, leaving pure charcoal behind. Let the fire burn out and the entire contraption completely cool before you approach it.
  9.  
    Remove the charcoal. Empty the small drum into a container and store the charcoal for later use.

How to Make Charcoal

Two Methods:Lighting a BonfireUsing Two Drums

Lump charcoal, which is made by burning pieces of wood until all the impurities are gone and only the coal remains, is an excellent choice for outdoor grilling. It's expensive to buy lump charcoal at the store, but making your own is a cheap and simple solution. Read on to learn how to make it using two different methods.

Lighting a Bonfire

  1.  
    Locate an area where you can build an outdoor fire. You may be able to do this in your backyard, or you may need to secure a different site with a permit. Check your city's ordinances on outdoor fires.


  2.  
    Get a metal drum. This is the container into which you'll put the wood. Choose a drum as large or as small as you'd like, depending on how much charcoal you want to make. Make sure it has a flame-proof lid.
  3.  
    Pick out wood to make into charcoal. What type of wood do you want to use for your charcoal? Choose wood that has been cured. Cherry wood, oak wood, or hickory wood all work well.[1] Check around to see if people in your area have wood for sale, or pick up some at a home and garden supply store. You'll need enough to fill up your drum to the top. Chop the wood into 4-inch pieces.[2]
  4.  
    Fill the drum with the cured wood. Pack the drum tightly with wood, and fill it all the way to the top. Put the lid on the drum. It should close well enough to stay in place, but you don't want it to be airtight.
  5.  
    Prepare to light a bonfire. Buy or gather extra wood to make a bonfire that will burn for 3 - 5 hours. Build it up on your chosen site. Leave a hole in the middle for the drum. Put the drum in the hole and cover it with more wood.[3]
  6.  
    Burn the bonfire. Keep it going for at least 3 hours, more if you're using a large drum packed with wood. Let the fire completely burn out and cool down before approaching the drum.
  7.  
    Remove the lump coal. When you open the lid, you'll see a fresh batch of pure lump coal. Use it to grill for the rest of the summer.

    Method 2

Using Two Drums

  1.  
    Buy a small drum and a larger drum. The small drum must fit in the larger one with plenty of room to spare. Using a 30 gallon (113.6 L) drum inside a 55 gallon (208.2 L) drum works well.[4]
  2.  
    Cut a fuel hold in the larger drum. Use a metal jigsaw blade to make a square cut in the base of the larger drum. It should be about 12 inches (30.5 cm) by 20 inches (50.8 cm). You'll need this hole to feed fuel into the drum to keep the contents hot.
  3.  
    Drill holes in the bottom of the smaller drum. This allows the extreme heat to pass into the the smaller drum, cooking the wood inside. Drill 5 or 6 1/2-inch holes in the base of the drum.
  4.  
    Fill the small drum with cured wood. Cherry wood, oak wood, or hickory wood chopped into 4-inch pieces is ideal. Pack the drum tightly, then put the lid on top, cracked so moisture can come out.[5]
  5.  
    Make a stand in the larger drum. Place two bricks flat in the bottom of the big drum, one on each side. Stand two more bricks on their long edges on top of the flat bricks. This stand keeps the smaller drum from touching the bottom of the bigger drum, allowing you to feed fuel underneath.
  6.  
    Place the smaller drum on the stand. Make sure it fits well within the larger drum; if it doesn't, use smaller bricks or stones to make a smaller stand. Put the lid on the larger drum, leaving it cracked open for air flow.
  7.  
    Build a fire inside the big drum and let it burn for 7-8 hours. Use wood and kindling to make a fire, feeding the materials through the feeder hole in the bottom of the drum. As the fire gets going, feed it larger pieces of wood.
    • Keep an eye on the fire; when it gets low, feed it more wood.
    • You want the fire to get as hot as possible, so keep feeding dense wood.
  8.  
    Let the fire burn out. After 7-8 hours, the impurities, moisture, and gasses will have burned out of the wood, leaving pure charcoal behind. Let the fire burn out and the entire contraption completely cool before you approach it.
  9.  
    Remove the charcoal. Empty the small drum into a container and store the charcoal for later use.